Arizona Bill 1070 

Curated by: Rossitza Todorova

Portfolio Contributors: May Hariri Aboutaam (San Ramon, CA), Megan Berner (Reno, NV), Elizabeth Blau (Las Vegas, NV), Mary Hood (Tempe, AZ), M. Gabriela Munoz (Tempe, AZ), Candace Nicol (Reno, NV), Rachel Nore (Tempe, AZ), Lauren Kinney (Tempe, AZ), Marlys Kubicek (Phoenix, AZ), Kathryn Polk (Tucson, AZ), Andrew Polk (Tucson, AZ), Alfred Quiroz (Tucson, AZ), Catherine Ruane (Phoenix, AZ), M. Jenea Sanchez (Tempe, AZ), Rossitza Todorova (Tempe, AZ), Patrick Vincent (Tempe, AZ), Wendy Willis (Phoenix, AZ)

Print Portfolio, 2011


Immigration is a major topic in today’s political landscape. Concerns about security and the economy have created a polarization of the immigration debate. Argument on illegal immigration and how it is encouraged, discouraged and enforced within the United States has been reignited with the signing of Arizona Bill SB1070 into Law.

The Arizona Immigration Bill SB1070 print portfolio, explores the Arizona immigration law, its implications, reasons and future affects on the state of Arizona as well as its immigrant populations both legal and illegal.

The debate on immigration is difficult to navigate. It is often presented as a simple black and white topic, however, the reality of its undercurrents are deep and complex. Many of the artists included in the portfolio are immigrants, come from immigrant families or live in communities affected by current immigration. Their point of view provides a rich discussion of this difficult and dividing topic. The artwork included gives light to motivations and barriers usually ignored by mass media.

Composed of 17 artists living throughout Arizona, California and Nevada the artwork in the portfolio is a unique look at how immigration affects the border states as well as the nation as a whole.



Catherine Ruane

Seeds of Resistance

Etching/chine colle, 2011,

9” x 12”

Ruane’s print addresses one reason Mexican farmers feel they need to leave their family farms and attempt a life in the United States. The competition from genetically modified seed stocks has made traditional Mexican farming economically unsustainable. The Zapatista farmers are working to maintain the ancient healthy native corn stock, to preserve this part of their cultural heritage for future generations.

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May Hariri Aboutaam

Unconstitutional

Akua water base ink, color, enhanced by hand, 2011

9” x 12” 
Aboutaam was born in Beirut, Lebanon and her work is contextualized by being a “third world citizen living in the West during the post-September 11th saga, in a state of ‘in-betweenness.’”

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Megan Berner

Migration

Linoleum relief, letter press, 2011, 9” x 12”

In Berner’s print the transposed outlines of the United States and Mexico are separated by a large blank space in which yellow lines mirror the yearly migration paths of monarch butterflies. The text is taken from excerpts on monarch migration and human immigration.

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Elizabeth Blau

Mobius Trip

Linoleum reduction relief

2011, 9” x 12”


Blau wanted to transcend a one-sided perspective on SB 1070 and chose the Möbius strip to represent the issue, because it has the mathematical property of being non-orientable. In this print the two arrows face each other and appropriate a traffic symbol used to keep vehicles from oncoming collision. Instead of a highway, they are placed in the desert to allude to “an inane migratory pattern.”

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Mary Hood

Im/migration

Intaglio print on handmade

paper with chine colle

2010, 9” x 12”

To describe this print, Hood quotes Milan Kundera from Slowness (1996): “The degree of slowness is directly proportional to the intensity of memory; the degree of speed is directly proportional to the intensity of forgetting.”

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Gabriela Munoz

Santo Mil Usos

Reduction relief on hand made paper, 2011, 9” x 12”

As a fronteriza herself, Munoz sees the border region as both a physical and psychological space. In this print Munoz creates a being that is “both sacred and secular, an inhabitant of a Mexico/U.S. hybrid environment from which all of us, on both sides of the border, benefit greatly, either by profiting from labor or from the remesas/wages sent back home.”

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Candace Nicol

SB 1070

4-Color etching, screenprint, 2010, 9” x 12”

This print is dedicated to Nicol’s cousin, Raul “Chato” Bravo, Jr., the son of an illegal immigrant from Mexico. Raised in an environment of proud loyalty to the new homeland, Bravo joined the U.S. Marine Corps and ended up sacrificing his life in Iraq for a country that “wants to build walls between Mexico and America.”

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Rachel Nore

Met with Fear, Courage, & Hope

Relief, 2011, 9” x 12”

The imagery in this print represents the fear, hope and courage that migrants bring with them, as well as the family and home left behind.

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Lauren Rose Kinney

Choke-Trap

Etching & watercolor

2011, 9” x 12”

This print portrays a cyclical living cage machine in which all parties are both part of the machine and trapped by the machine. It can be viewed as a visual metaphor for legislation that “isolates and turns people against each other.”

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Marlys Kubicek

Money Talks

Etching, collage, 2011, 9” x 12”

Kubicek created this print to shed light on the fact that lobbyists for two of the biggest supporters of SB 1070, Correction Corporation of America and GEO Corporation, helped write the legislation. These corporations run the private prisons that will directly benefit from an increase in detention of suspected illegal immigrants.

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Andrew Polk

SB 1070

Offset lithography, 2011,

9” x 12”

Polk’s lithograph describes the legal aftermath of SB 1070.

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Kathryn Polk

SB 1070

lithography, 2011, 9” x 12”

This print depicts a sign that hung over a restroom door in an ice cream parlor in Memphis, Tennessee. Polk pried it off the doorframe after Martin Luther King was assassinated, and has kept it ever since. She brought it out again when SB 1070 passed, as the bill reminded her of a time when racial discrimination was practiced openly.

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Alfred Quiroz

New Jobs

Lthography and screenprint

2011, 9” x 12”

With satirical humor, Quiroz challenges the belief that illegal labor takes away jobs that would otherwise be desired by American citizens.

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M. Jenea Sanchez

Window display in Mexico City

Blind emboss on digital print

2011, 9” x 12”

Eurocentrism is embedded throughout the world, particularly in marketing. By focusing on this window display in Mexico City, Sanchez asks us to contemplate the consequences of perpetuating racial and cultural insecurity.

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M. Jenea Sanchez

Window display in Mexico City (detail)

Blind emboss on digital print

2011, 9” x 12”

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Rossitza Todorova

Where are you from..Originally?

Linoleum reduction relief

2011, 9” x 12”

As an immigrant from Bulgaria who moved to the U.S. in the early 1990s, Todorova is used to being questioned about where she is from. But when she moved to Phoenix in 2010 at the height of the immigration debate, she noticed immediately that the question was asked with a different slant – the questioner expressing surprise and relief when she answered, as if, if she were from certain places, it would have provoked suspicion or fear. She wonders, “If I, an integrated naturalized U.S. citizen, could feel the tension of discrimination within this simple, harmless question, then how are other immigrant populations being treated?”

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Patrick Vincent

Between Foxes & Coyotes

Woodcuts, relief collagraph, Letterpress

2011, 9” x 12”

Vincent depicts the border area as dangerous through reference to the political right (Fox news) and human smugglers, i.e. coyotes. The rabbit serves as an icon of naïve attempts at deceit, as a type of prey typical to coyotes and foxes, as well as a Mexican derogatory slant term, conejos.

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Wendy Willis

Native Son

Etching

2011, 9” x 12”

Willis illuminates the poignant problem of mixed legal and illegal family members, and a child’s fear of being sent abroad to live when all you’ve known is American life.

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